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Our Research

Families in the programThe Refugee Well-being Study is a 5 year-long Community-based Participatory Research study that interviews families over time to better understand processes of resettlement and to promote well-being. We implement both qualitative and quantitative methods of research.

Publications

Hess, JM; Isakson, B; Nelson, M; Goodkind, JR (2017). "My World is Upside Down": Transnational Iraqi youth and Parent Perspectives on Resettlement in the United States. Journal of Immigrant & Refugee Studies.

JR Goodkind, S Amer, C Christian, JM Hess, D Bybee, B Isakson, B Baca, M Ndayisenga, N Greene and C Shantzek (2016). "Challenges and Innovations in a Community-Based Participatory Randomized Controlled Trial". Health Education and Behavior.

Nelson, Matthew; Hess, JM; Isakson, B; Goodkind, JR (2015). "Seeing the Life": Redefining Self-Worth and Family Roles Among Iraqi Refugee Families Resettled in the United States. Journal of International Migration and Integration

Hess, Julia M.; Isakson, Brian; Githinji, Ann; Roche, Natalie; Vadnais, Kathryn; Parker, Danielle P.; Goodkind, Jessica R. (2014). Reducing mental health disparities through transformative learning: A social change model with refugees and students. Psychological Services, Vol 11 (3), 347-356

Goodkind, J.R., Hess, J. M., Isakson, B., LaNoue, M., Githinji, A., Roche, N., Vadnais, K., & Parker, D. P. (2013). Reducing Refugee Mental Health Disparities: A
Community-Based Intervention to Address Postmigration Stressors With African Adults. Psychological Services.

Goodkind, J. R., Githinji, A., & Isakson, B. (2011). Reducing health disparities experienced by refugees resettled in urban areas: A community-based transdisciplinary intervention model. In M. Kirst, N. Schaefer-McDaniel, S. Hwang, & P. O’Campo (Eds.), Converging disciplines: A transdisciplinary research approach to urban health problems (pp. 41–55). New York, NY: Springer.

Goodkind, J. R. (2006). Promoting Hmong Refugees' Well-Being Through Mutual Learning: Valuing Knowledge, Culture, and Experience. American Journal of Community Psychology, 37.

Goodkind, J. R., Hang, P., & Yang, M. (2004). Hmong refugees in the United States: A community-based advocacy and learning intervention. In K. E. Miller & L. M. Rasco (Eds.), The mental health of refugees: Ecological approaches to healing and adaptation (pp. 295–336). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum, Inc.

Goodkind, J. R. (2006). Promoting Hmong Refugees' Well-Being Through Mutual Learning: Valuing Knowledge, Culture, and Experience. American Journal of Community Psychology, 37.

Goodkind, J. R. (2005). Effectiveness of a community-based advocacy and learning program for Hmong refugees. American Journal of Community Psychology, 36, 387–408. doi:10.1007/s10464-005-8633-z

What Our Participants Are Saying

“In the beginning, I had no idea what a refugee was... I know now that they’re forced to flee… they don’t just flee because they want to… after working with them, I don’t really consider them refugees because I feel like that term makes people feel sorry for them more, feel sympathetic towards them when—I mean, they’re probably some of the most hardworking people I’ve ever met.”

-  UNM Student-Advocate

Contact RWP

Coordinator: Martin Ndayisenga

Phone: (505) 277-0197

Email: rwp@unm.edu


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